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40 years of Danish furniture design

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Product design
- 20 Feb 2017 -
27 posts / 0 new
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Product design

Lindhardt og Ringhof is reissuing "40 years of Danish furniture design" by Grete Jalk in a 4 books set. Bilingual edition, in Danish and in English.


Date of release: end of May 2017.


The bad news is that it won't be cheap: 2.500 DKK for the set (ca. 336€ / 357 USD) and the four books won't be sold separatly.


40 years of Danish furniture design
Country
Denmark

Comments

- 21 Feb 2017

Can't wait. I'll gladly PAY $400 instead of the $1000 they go for now.

- 21 Feb 2017

Any idea if it will be available for pre-order or where online it can be purchased?

- 21 Feb 2017

Yes, it seems that it is available to preorder. The danish online book store Saxo delivers to France so I guess they deliver to the US as well (beware that even for books, shipping from Denmark is pretty expensive).

I am posting the link here but please remove it if it is against the forum rules. Note that I am in no way related to the publisher or the book store.

https://www.saxo.com/dk/dansk-moebelkunst-gennem-40-aar-1927-1966_grete-...

- 22 Feb 2017

Dr Poulet,

I have attached a photo of the original publication Grete Jalk Dansk Møbelkunst gennem 40 arr (40 years of Danish furniture design) The Copenhagen Cabinet-maker's Guild Exhibitions 1927-1966 volumes 1-4 for Teknologisk Instituts Forlag 1987 in case there are any purist in the forum.

- 22 Feb 2017

Richard,

Please send my warmest regards to ETP.

cds

- 22 Feb 2017

Thanks for posting the link. Hoping I may be able to purchase through Amazon in the future-once book is issued. Maybe I'll even get free Prime shipping. Not holding my breath, though.

- 06 Mar 2017

Thank you for posting. They have a copy at the local university library. I'll have a look at them.
Cheers

- 01 Jun 2017

Are these books in both Danish and English? I see there is both on the cover : )

- 01 Jun 2017

The original is in both Danish and English. It is hard to imagine the re-print would be anything less.

- 01 Jun 2017

Thanks, Leif. I think the conversion comes to roughly $500 Cdn for the set (before shipping)!! Pricey set of books : )

- 01 Jun 2017

Compared to the original edition, that is a very good price. If you are interested in Danish furniture in a scholarly way at all, you have to have them.

- 02 Jun 2017

I might have to pop for that.

A good friend let me borrow his original set. Dear god. I was so nervous something BAD was going to happen to them. They very well might have been the most expensive thing in the house at that moment. Tremendous eye candy, though.

- 15 Jun 2017

Hi all,

just got the set from the local university library. That's what I have been looking for ages.

Looking forward to have a look at them. I am considering buying these books, though they are not cheap.

Cheers
Ernest

- 15 Jun 2017

How exhaustive is it? Most designers you could think of covered?

- 18 Jun 2017

These books make me reflect on the fact that during the 40es in Denmark people could still deserve time and energy to design and build beautiful ( and not strictly necessary) furniture, while in many european coutries most of the industry production was converted to military purposes. In this book I found one paragraph where it seems that the (outside of Denmark) situation affects the availability of wood (see pictures).

I guess that the watches industry in Switzerland has undergone a similar situation.

These considerations might be obvious for most, but still worth spending a though.

Cheers, Ernest.

- 18 Jun 2017

And just because Leif has recently pointed out that "polka dots" are not completely unseen in Danish furniture, here is an example.

- 18 Jun 2017

so can we buy the reprints? They are available? $2500 for a set I found hard to justify but $500 I'd REALLY have to consider

- 18 Jun 2017

The above Saxo link appears to still be active and taking orders. The current 2500 DKK price equates to ~$380 today before shipping.

- 19 Jun 2017

Kyle: If you are interested in ultra high end cabinetmaker pieces, I would say it is fairly complete. If you are interested in later factory pieces or factory designers, you won't see any of that in there. So it is the best resource for identifying the very few pieces at the pinnacle of Danish furniture design.

Ernest: yes, that is one example of polka dots that I was thinking of. Another example would be Finn Juhl's Judas table. And there are other; they might qualify as big circles though, not polka dots.

- 19 Jun 2017

I got my copy a few dys ago and I'd say it's definitely worth the money if you are really and deeply interested in the danish cabinetmaker-tradition. Although it should be said, that the book consists almost exclusively of photos and sections of contemporary newspaper articles. There's no backgroundstory to it, so it is basically a very large and heavy source book, a work of reference. But having said that, it's the most comprehensive you'll find.

- 19 Jun 2017

It's probably worth to summarize the introduction of the book to undestand a bit better what exactly this book is about.

Every year there was a little fair where cabinet makers and designers would present their new ideas and prototypes. The pieces exposed would be photographed and commented, and all the relative articles and photographs have been resurrected by Grete Jalk (with the help of others) and beautifully put into these 4 volumes.

You'll find inside the 4 volumes furniture from a small group of cabinet makers, which participated regularly to these meetings. You'll see beautiful pieces which unfortunately are impossible to find these days, due to the fact that they never went to mass production. But some are very famous pieces.

But you won't find many other remarkable cabinet makers, as Moller or Andreas Tuck, to cite a few. The reasons why they did not take part to this annual event, I do not know.

Because furniture cathalogues from that time are not available or very rare, these 4 volumes fill partially the gap. Worth having them in my opinion, but don't expect you won't need any help from the experts of this forum to identify your pieces again.

Cheers,
Ernest.

PS: please correct me if I have written something wrong, as I am the least of the experts here.

- 19 Jun 2017

Some quick, but important clarifications:

- the exhibitions were sponsored and comprised of Copenhagen-based cabinetmakers. The term cabinetmaker (snedker) or master cabinetmaker (snedkermester) are historical prestigious titles bestowed upon guild members who were able to achieve certain levels of skill, quality, and speed. There were many other snedkermesters around the country who did not participate in these exhibitions.

- J.L. Moller and Andreas Tuck were furniture factories that were developed to meet increased demand (much of it overseas) and cost pressures which the low-volume cabinetmakers could either not handle or did not want to handle. Quite a few of these early furniture factories were headed up by snedkermesters, who modified their traditional method of working to adapt to a more modern economic/production climate. Carl Hansen, who was run by the snedkermester, Holger Hansen, during the middle of the Danish Modern heyday, is a good example of a such a factory.

- with a few exceptions, there is an inherent quality difference between cabinetmaker furniture and factory furniture. The former was mostly handmade with traditional joinery and craftmanship. The latter used mostly dowels joints and machine-made parts, which could be produced more efficiently for larger scale production.

These are fairly quick comments. Here is link to a paper which goes into Danish Modern in much greater detail. I would recommend this paper (and have) to anyone who wants to have a better understanding of Danish Modern history: www.ebha.org/ebha2004/papers/6D3.doc

- 19 Jun 2017

Andreas Tuck was actually an existing business very similar to Carl Hansen. The Hansen and Tuck families were on friendly terms. The Hansen family brought the Tuck family into the Salesco consortium to make Wegner furniture. So whatever title applies to Carl Hansen should just about equally apply to Andreas Tuck. In my personal opinion Andreas Tuck might have done the finest work of any of the Salesco companies.

Møller was very much a new company jumping into the Danish furniture market.

The one other thing that unifies all the other makers, prestigious or not, who are not in the book, is that they were not in Copenhagen. Møller is in the Aarhus area. Carl Hansen and Andreas Tuck are/were in the Odense area.

A. Mikael Laursen is also probably a good example of a prestigious maker who you won't see in there. He was also in the Aarhus area.

If you want to understand the history of Danish modern, these books are essential. If you want to identify random pieces of furniture at a sale, they are almost worthless.

- 20 Jun 2017

cdsilva, thank you for the paper, which I am looking forward to read.

Leif, I also think that Andreas Tuck has manufactured very nice pieces.

Cheers,

Ernest.

- 28 Jun 2017

Here one of the pieces that has mostly impressed me by reading these books.
I hope I'll find one of these one day.

Cheers
Ernest.

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