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The last thing you acquired #53

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Product design
- 23 Sep 2017 -
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Product design

Alright, I am going to save Spanky the trouble of having to start a new thread this time. When we get over 100 posts, and more than 3 pages, it is usually time....


I got a cart and 4 tables. I am actually really excited for this find, as it is one of my favorite forms for the tea-cart medium in Danish furniture. While I have no ill will towards the tea cart, I usually find that their primary utility is as a plant stand, display for pottery, or some other static use. While I have used one of my carts for actually serving a couple times, far and away they usually sit unused. This piece however, will certainly provide utility for those nights dinner is served somewhere other than dinner table (which is fairly often in our house). Plus it has 5 separate surfaces for display, cocktail parties, and a myriad of other applications.


It is overall in pretty good shape. The original owner, is was told, got a bit careless in her old age, and one of the daughters (thanks for the term Leif) was stained. Not anything some Oxalic Acid wont remedy, but otherwise I will let these exist as is, with no refinishing.


I have seen lots of these out there with the square legs and Eastern European origin, but very few actual Hundevad and Co pieces with the round legs. It also seems that Hundevad and Co produced this design in both 4 and 3 table versions. Not sure anyone was ever able to narrow down exactly who designed them, but it would seem that Carlo Jensen is the most likely candidate.


The last thing you acquired #53

Comments

- 23 Sep 2017

Carlo Jensen was the designer. He was part owner of Hundevad & Co (as in part of the '& Co').

The tops on the daughter tables are made of a core of solid Afrormosia, with teak veneer top and bottom, which is an interesting thing, not too commonly seen.

And be careful with the legs on the mothership. There is are 4 steel bars embedded in it with threads. If you torque the legs you can rip the top apart. I had one that this happened to. All I still have are the little daughter tables. There are very few things that can coexist as a side table to a Papa Bear, and the daughters happen to be one of them.

- 24 Sep 2017

Thanks for the heads up Leif. I assumed that is how they were attached, and a bit surprise that there is not a stretcher between the two legs on a common side, but I will definitely be careful.

Minimoma, cool score. The old (and new) Bang and Olufsen stuff is super cool, so ahead of it's time. I have a B&O system (receiver and turntable) in the basment, boxed away that is my mother-in-laws. I have not looked at it in years, and it is from the 1980's I believe. Once I get my basement squared away, I was planning on digging it out, and setting it up.

- 24 Sep 2017

Thanks for the heads up Leif. I assumed that is how they were attached, and a bit surprise that there is not a stretcher between the two legs on a common side, but I will definitely be careful.

Minimoma, cool score. The old (and new) Bang and Olufsen stuff is super cool, so ahead of it's time. I have a B&O system (receiver and turntable) in the basment, boxed away that is my mother-in-laws. I have not looked at it in years, and it is from the 1980's I believe. Once I get my basement squared away, I was planning on digging it out, and setting it up.

- 24 Sep 2017

Zephyr, the Beomaster 1200 also dubbed "the tombstone" is the Jurassic ancestor of the touch screen technology we have now except it only requires an inexpensive power source instead of relying entirely on the mercy of a service provider to be useful.

Share images of the Beosystem you have when you get to it. I hope the transport screws feature was engaged on the turntable before it was moved & stored (most of the time it is the source of why it stopped working properly).

- 24 Sep 2017

Lovely stuff. Never saw the tea set before; what sort of hinge is used on the daughter tables ?

- 24 Sep 2017

A pair of plain leaf hinges on the bottom sides attach the flaps. And the daughter tables are a gate leg design basically: lift the flaps and open the gateleg.

The whole thing is a clever design that tries to convince you mightily that the ideal way to serve is on a mini stowable table with the meal delivered on the mothership.

- 28 Sep 2017

My ebay art binge continues

A really wonderful and quirky sculpture. The base is mosaic wood bits and the top is cast cement. Weighs near a ton. Just a great thing

- 28 Sep 2017

Good heavens -- literally: could it be a church font, or maybe a birdbath ? A planter ? Or are questions of use entirely beside the point ?

I like it, in any event.

- 28 Sep 2017

I THINK besides the point? But I pondered that reservoir at the top for a bit as well.... a place to put one's hopes and dreams?

- 28 Sep 2017

Well -- it appears to have been wetted with something . . . at some point ? That got me thinking. Do you know who made it ?

I can see it in a Brutalist environment, can you ? Or am I striking out with you altogether !

- 28 Sep 2017

yeah, I noticed that about the depression. I'll look at it closer.

No idea who made it and cannot find a mark anywhere. Sort of Mabel Hutchinson? But not Mabel Hutchinson.

I seem to like brutalist things. I like materials. I like seeing them, in this case wood and cement. The nature of this appeals to me at a very basic level

....of course the wife didn't like it but it will grow on her. She trusts my taste

In my opinion it's a very well done thing

EDIT - Yeah, church font makes alot of sense

- 28 Sep 2017

Fabulous waffle!

Best,

Aunt Mark

- 29 Sep 2017

as always, thank you Mark.

I hope all is well with you and yours!

My wife is warming to it. Much as she warmed to me 35 years ago....

- 29 Sep 2017

To be pedantic, cement is an ingredient in concrete, which is perhaps the correct name for the material of your piece ?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Concrete

Carry on, and let us know how you ultimately employ it !

- 29 Sep 2017

no, please, pedant away

You are correct. I think it's a regionalism thing. in Chicago you always called everything "cement". "OOOH, fresh cement! Lets ride our bikes through it!" Like that. It's something I've never shaken. And I've poured truckloads of Concrete/cement in my day.

I spent a good bit of time trying to at least find something similar w/o much luck. And yes, I tried it using BOTH Cement and Concrete as search terms.

I rather like it right where it currently resides, inside on that sort of shelf. That wood would not survive outside methinks.

I still think your proposal of it being a church font is a good one.

- 29 Sep 2017

Yes, it certainly is an indoor piece, as is. How is the wood base connected to the . . . cement ? Does it appear certain that the wood is an original part of the construction ? The wood is nicely stained and finished, it seems. Such an interesting object !

- 29 Sep 2017

it just sits on it, or in it I guess. It could be a later addition but I really doubt it. The CONCRETE thingy has marks on the bottom that correspond to where it sits on the wood, so it had to sit there for a bit methinks.

I'll scour it one more time for any kind of makers' mark but i'll be darned if I could find anything. The person who I bought it from was a packing genius. So happy it didn't get damaged in transit.

- 29 Sep 2017

Yes, it's nice to have it in such good shape. I'm surprised no effort was made to connect the base to the shaft, for reasons of sturgidity. (I'm notorious for fussing about such things. I am otherwise a flaming liberal; only with structure do I become conservative !) That leaves open the possibility that the wood isn't original to the piece, of course -- but the two are certainly sympatico. If the shaft had originally been buried in soil, that would be evident -- and extra material would have been added to the height ? The proportion as is seems perfect . . .

Is this a Brancusi/Corbusier-inspired object ? Noguchi ?

- 29 Sep 2017

I can't tell for sure from your photos what the scale of this thing is--30" or so? Bigger? The staining inside the basin definitely doesn't look like it's from being used as a planter, or even a birdbath but it does look like it held water at some point--the efflorescence, the brown staining at the very bottom. That got me thinking--could it have been a pedestal for a gazing ball in a garden? And rainwater would have pooled under the ball? The very bottom wouldn't necessarily have soil staining if it had been sitting on a paved surface of some sort---stone, concrete, wood decking, maybe just a concrete stepping stone. It may even be a homemade thing. Concrete craft has been huge for awhile now and there are some pretty slick things being churned out by DIYers. (My sister among them.)

To round out the scenario, the person who made it moved from the house with the garden but was loath to leave his or her objet, so he/she made a stylishly abstract wood base to kind of tame it a bit for indoor display. The movers broke the gazing ball. The end.

- 29 Sep 2017

it's POSSIBLE?

The recessed area is too deep, I would think, to simply be a receptacle for a gaze ball, or whatever. And the edges are not leveled in a manner that would suggest that use. The wood has been inside for sure. It shows no signs of being outside. IT SURE DOES look like it held something liquid-y at some point.

I scoured it again for any sigs or marks and none were found.

The overall height isn't that much, maybe 22" or so? It is all held together simply by the weight of the concrete thingy. It must weigh 20 lbs.

As for who does it remind me of, what school, etc. Really not sure. FLW liked concrete and wood surfaces. Brancusi came to mind but he liked PERFECT surfaces. This is more constructivist. The closest match I found to the wood was Mabel Hutchinson. But I don't think it is her.

I'll ask the guy I bought it from to see if he/she has any clues.

- 29 Sep 2017

Oh, 22" high...well, then I'm gonna go with mid-century modern sacrificial offering font.

- 29 Sep 2017

Gently place a sanitized chicken bone in it. And a note. See what happens.

Best,

Aunt Mark

- 30 Sep 2017

Not quite Xavier lalanne

Creative playthings Toy turned footstool

- 30 Sep 2017

My only concrete project occurred more than fifty years ago, when I had a job where cardboard tubes were discarded. I brought some pieces home and made this riff on the Japanese garden lantern.

Corrugated cardboard in the mould provided a little texture to the terminals of the "rose." The shaft was 8 inches in diameter, the height under 3 feet, as I recall it. It stood outside my mother's studio for many years.

- 02 Oct 2017

A PS Wall system from a yard sale and my second Wegner J16 (Black & Brown) from lucking out on random kijiii browsing!

- 02 Oct 2017

Ponyboy I have that colour combo J16 and it's my favourite thing!
I've collected a few armchairs that I probably should have left behind as their condition wasn't amazing for the most part. However I've come to realise I can't pass something I like by! I'll keep one....pass on the rest...probably for what I paid for them. Does anyone else pick things up to investigate and play with them rather than keep them? I'll definitely just get my money back on the two I'll pass on. Of course the one I could get a bit out of I'm keeping forever... so I got an unidentified lounge chair with bentwood frame, a Greaves and Thomas recliner chair that no longer reclines and an as yet unidentified leather (and possibly Jacaranda) sling chair. Possibly a Mole chair attributed to Sergio Rodrigues but there are quite a few differences. Mine seems to be able to knockdown, and the belts aren't held in place by screws. I've sent off some enquiries so hopefully I'll get some answers!

- 03 Oct 2017

Reamie - I'm pretty happy lucking out on finding the black J16. The brown one I have is nice but I never loved the shade of brown it is. It can stay at my parents place now and they can enjoy it : )

- 04 Oct 2017

Ponyboy I was about to curse you, as I missed out on one of these 36 minutes after the ad had been posted last week! It was listed as a 'nursing chair', which I thought was quite cute, but I was really looking forward to getting my first Wegner piece!

But since you're in Canada and not the UK, it might be a bit unfair to blame you..

- 06 Oct 2017

Kyle Barrett - I am sure there were a couple people cursing me! Happy to see you were not one of them ; )

Found a new old stock Braun AB 40 vsl alarm clock. I am always on the look out for a Braun wall clock but this little buddy was a pleasant surprise.

- 07 Oct 2017

Found several abandoned cabinets outside the office loading dock designed by Eliel Saarinen with daughter Pipsan & son in law Robert Swanson. Originally commissioned for the Koebel Residence near Detroit, Michigan in 1937 & later produced by Johnson Furniture in 1939 known as the "Flexible Home Arrangement". These need some conservation work but are in very good vintage condition.

A pink post it & some other interesting items had fallen off the drawers & got stuck inside the cabinets.

- 07 Oct 2017

Wow, that's really cool. I imagine someone will be upset they've lost those! Remember the days when presidents did nice things?

The drawers are really nice too.

- 08 Oct 2017

Thanks Kyle, I thought I was going to mail back the misplaced stuff I found inside the cabinets, but the first item that showed up on the person's name in quick google search was an obituary from a few years ago.

Eliel Saarinen not just introduced the light wood aesthetic in furniture & case goods in the USA (pioneered by Aalto & Mathsson in the 1930s), he also mentored the best American designers while at Cranbrook Academy...son Eero, Florence Schust (Knoll), Ray Kaiser (Eames), Charles Eames, Harry Bertoia, Jack Lenor Larsen & other names I can't remember at the moment.

- 08 Oct 2017

Thanks, minimoma. What a nice story. We need to know more about the Saarinens and Cranbrook. Is there a biography of Eliel ?

- 08 Oct 2017

Minimoma that's amazing, what a find! Also, great to learn something new. I didn't know Aero was in the family business. Thank you.

- 08 Oct 2017

Minimona, what a great find! And free, even.

The letter was written to a new baby and I'm sure the baby's parents would love to have it back if you can ever track them down. Don't throw it out just yet!

- 08 Oct 2017

Oh I so agree with spanky.

How cool of you it would be, to get this put into the intended hands. I'll bet that the good deed would repay itself many times over. and over. and.

yup,

Aunt Mark

- 10 Oct 2017

Spanky, I suspect these cabinets were from the effects of the last recession when the homeowners were evicted by force & their possessions haphazardly removed & piled on the street for trash pick up & ended up getting scattered all over.

- 10 Oct 2017

Nice! That Penguin is an interesting hybrid in which the wood shell was made in Denmark and married to a metal frame made in the USA by Selig. I don’t know of any other similar phenomenon in the context of Danish Modern.

- 10 Oct 2017

It was one on my bucket list so I'm proud to own one. The backrest (teak?) is stamped made in Denmark while the iron frame was done by a shop in California if I'm not mistaken. An interesting partnership to be sure.

- 14 Oct 2017

Braun table top (w/ optional wall mount piece) coffee grinder, Dieter Rams, 1969

Braun juicer, Reinhold Weiss & Robert Obenheim, 1965

- 15 Oct 2017

Sorry for the poor quality of the photo but I picked up one of these Model 64's and two matching Model 79's which having all been reupholstered very well at some stage, the makers mark was obscured, leading to them passing through a local auction with very little interest.

Speaking to one of the porters who had collected them originally and had spoken to the owner, they had been purchased in the late 60's as a set of six 79's and two 64's, but sadly the rest had gradually succumbed to the ravages of time and, one by one, had gone to the refuse tip (facepalm)

Sublimely beautiful pieces.

- 15 Oct 2017

Sorry, I'm not familiar. Who designed these lovely chairs ?

- 15 Oct 2017

Yes!

And what a lovely batik. I have the perfect pair of pants to wear whilst perched upon.

Yes,

Aunt Mark

- 15 Oct 2017

Odd choice of fabric really, but for a mid-life upholstery it's really not all that awful. In comparison to my Moller armchair's upholstery it's positively beautiful. Which reminds me, I really need to get on with cording it.

- 15 Oct 2017

Those are by Møller, SDR! I used to have a set in rosewood. I love the arms on them.

I like the fabric a lot. I love Indian textiles.

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