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AT table covered with plastic

Category
Product design
Section
Repair
- 10 Feb 2018 -
20 posts / 0 new
#1
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Product design

Dear All,


I've recently got this AT table (by the way,do you know the number?). Single-owner, bought in a local shop in 1964. Cover with plastic layer to protect the wood. After removal with the aid of an hair-dryer (to minimize wood removal), I can see the differences in color between area where there was plastic or not.


It's a very big and nice piece of solid oak, and I see that it's super thirsty of oil. Could you recommend me an oil for oak without varnish?


Thank you.

Ernest


AT table covered with plastic
Periods
1960 - 1969

Comments

- 10 Feb 2018

Guardian wood oil from Denmark. It is expensive and hard to find but an excellent product.

- 10 Feb 2018

Are you sure the original finish is oil? The photo of the edge makes me think it might be lacquer. You can easily test this with a bit of nail polish remover in an inconspicuous area. The solvent will dissolve lacquer within 10 seconds and turn it into a gel and then liquid as it reconstitutes. It'll remove oil too but you won't see the gel reaction with oil.

- 10 Feb 2018

Dr Poulet, thank you for the hint. By the way, I have to thank you for another reason too. You suggested me some time ago to ask for pillows of a grete jalk chair to the galerie mobler shop. they made them, but the measures where off. They proposed me to remake them for free. I think that another company would have tried to convince me that the measures were sufficiently right to be acceptable. They are certainly very honest people.

For spanky: thank you for the hint: I'll try that, but I am faily sure there is no finish on top, or maybe most of it is gone from the glue of the plastic? It would look quite odd with the legs, which are clearly not finished with laquer.

Cheers,
Ernest.

- 10 Feb 2018

Because of the advanced level of patination, I suspect it may have originally been soap finished, or very lightly oiled.

- 10 Feb 2018

Have you ever seen such a plastic cover on a Danish piece? That was the first time for me. It indicates that the owner was very respectful, probably due to the high price paid at that time. It reminds me of the habit of keeping couches with plastic, in Italy in the same period - to not consume them too much. The seller could have communicated them that a regular oil and steel wool treatment would have sufficed. Do you know as well the AT number for this table?

Leif, could you comment maybe on the need to have such big couch tables? Where Danish apartments particularly big at that time? I certainly appears too big for my living room!

Cheers,
Ernest.

- 10 Feb 2018

People do all kinds of crazy stuff to their furniture, usually for reasons that seem perfectly valid to them at the time. Adhesive transparent plastic probably seemed like a great way to them to protect the beautiful wood from spills, drips, etc. Some people would rather do that than worry about getting rid of water spots later. No oil finish will protect nearly as well as plastic. (I know I got really tired of watching out for every little drip during meals when we had a rosewood table; I finally sold it and got something better suited to the way my family lives. And it's not like we're terrible slobs, even!)

I have been in a lot of Danish homes and I'd say most have smallish rooms. We lived in a huge house there for a year but it was built in 1910 when times were different. Danish friends who visited said it was very unusual to have such big rooms (living room 16'x25', dining room the same size). We couldn't even use some of the rooms in winter because they just cost too much to heat. Smaller makes more sense. Maybe the large coffee table was meant to be the only table in the room? I don't know.

- 10 Feb 2018

Thank you, spanky. Very interesting.

I think it is always useful to see these pieces in the catalogues of that time. Do you guys have anything on this table?

Unrelated question just that we are talking about catalogues: is it possible that the CH31 chairs were sold in pair with a round table (extendable, both in teak or palisander), with four L-shaped legs that start from the center of the table? As you might remember I recently acquired four CH31, and this guy had in the cellar that table. It's not the most beautiful Danish piece I have ever seen, as I found it "very heavy" in the design. Recently, I saw the same table attribute to Hans Wegner, with a label domus danica (but no name of HW). Any clue?

I attach a picture of the table that I saw attribute to HW, and if memory is correct it should be the same table. I remember a metal hook under the table to extend it.

Thank you
Ernest.

- 10 Feb 2018

Thank you very much for the feedback. I know the owner pretty well and I wouldn’t expect anything less from them. I believe this should be the norm and not the other way around.

- 11 Feb 2018

Also, my guess is that a large coffee table was not design for Danish tastes or homes, but rather for American tastes and homes.

- 11 Feb 2018

Oh, and finally, I believe the table you showed in post #8 is John Mortensen for Heltborg. The Domus Danica label suggests that as Heltborg was part of the Domus Danica collective.

- 11 Feb 2018

Yes, 85 cm... great guess. And thank you for the ID of the other table. I see there is also another thread about that.

Would you know the number of the AT table (sorry to ask again)

Cheers
Ernest

- 11 Feb 2018

Hi! Just got some images of the table in question: is it the same that you mentioned?
Thank you!
Ernest.

- 11 Feb 2018

It was not a guess, I was reading an option from the AT catalog. So it is AT-12. Are the legs darker than the top?

The catalog claims smoked oak legs, but I am curious if the top is also smoked.

And note that there were three different sizes of this table with steel or oak legs, so it is not immediately obvious that this is the model number because the photo is not the same.

- 11 Feb 2018

Yes, they are darker than the top, so it makes sense that they were smoked. thank you for the ID, it was not easy to find it on google.

Cheers,
Ernest.

- 11 Feb 2018

Wait---85cm each side is only 33". That's not terribly big for a coffee table. It might be too much for a very narrow room, or in rooms with certain sofa/chair sizes & arrangements, but I think it would work fine in most rooms, American or Danish.

- 11 Feb 2018

That's true, probably my living is just too small. It is true that Andreas Tuck or other cabinet makers made couch tables even longer than 1.60 m!

Cheers
Ernest

- 11 Feb 2018

That makes sense...

I tried to apply some nail remover (with alcool, no acetone, my wife's choice) on the edge where there is the black line, and there is no gel coming off, but it cleans the dark patina very well. I now understand why people use acetone instead of many hands of oil. I am not sure still I'll apply this approach to the rest of the table. Maybe not.

Cheers
Ernest.

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